Thumbkin: Buro Angla

Abanindranath Tagore

Translated from the Bengali original by Nonda Chatterjee

Cover Design and Illustrations by Agantuk

 

A boy cruel to animals is now doomed to suffer the same fate he inflicted upon them. To escape from his problem, he has to undertake a journey of self-discovery.

Categories: , Age: Format: ISBN: Price: ₹199 Product ID: 1504

Description

A boy cruel to animals, is now doomed to suffer the same fate he inflicted upon them. To escape from his problem, he has to undertake a journey of self-discovery.

About the Book

Hriday, a naughty little boy, is unthinkingly cruel to animals. He goes his merry way till a terrible crime causes him to be turned into a Thumbkin with no prospect of return to the human world.

Now, he is at the mercy of the very same animals he has wronged, and is desperate to make amends. But all the animals are happy with his situation! Finally, the pet lame swan of the family takes pity and Hriday is wafted away on his creaky wings to the Himalayas in search of Lord Ganesha who can save him.

Little does Hriday realize that this will be the beginning of the strangest adventure in the worlds of mice and men, Gods and demons, hate and love, and better understanding . . .

About the Author

Abanindranath Tagore (1871–1951) became famous as a painter with a unique style amalgamating and modernizing different forms of painting in India that led to the development of modern Indian painting through the Bengal School of Art. But he was equally noted as a writer. Popularly known as Aban Thakur, he was urged to write for children by his uncle Rabindranath Tagore. He wove the folklores and myths of Bengal into his stories, created vivid imageries in his writings that marked the turning point in early Bengali children’s literature. His best known books include Khirer Putul, Buro Angla, Rajkahini and Nalok.

 

About the Translator

Nonda Chatterjee (1938–2012), was a much loved and widely respected educator. She was widely read in Hindi, Bengali and English literature. A scholar, a novelist, and a writer of short stories and articles, Nonda Chatterjee drew much of her intellectual inspiration from nineteenth and twentieth century Indian history. She contributed short stories and articles to The Statesman and The Sakaal Times among other publications, and her poems have been published in the journal, Indian Literature. She has to her credit a collection of short stories, The Strawberry Patch and a novel, Half a Face.